Why You Can’t Stop Running, According to Psychologists

Why You Can’t Stop Running, According to Psychologists

Why You Can’t Stop Running, According to Psychologists

If you’re a runner, you probably know the feeling: You take up jogging and go running every second day, and pretty soon you’re making gains, knocking off three miles, no problem. So you then step it up to six miles, and soon you start running every day. Before long, you’re scouting around for any half marathon that will take you.

RELATED:  Best Workout Shoes

Gains, right? Well, not necessarily. What if all those miles, logged on fitness apps and shared on social media, are doing you more harm than good? What if you, in fact, have a running problem? According to psychologists Andrew Wood and Martin Turner from Staffordshire University in the U.K., it’s a lot more common than you think.
When Getting Healthy Becomes Unhealthy

So when does running become bad for you? Wood and Turner say it’s when your relationship to exercise starts changing. You no longer run because you love it, but to beat yourself. And in the process you form something of an addiction to running.

“The danger with this situation is that your self-worth is becoming attached to running," the two wrote for a piece in The Conversation. Wood and Turner cite research in the piece that suggests people who define themselves as an exerciser or runner are in greater danger of becoming dependent on exercise.

Review

Add new comment